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Trailfest 2015: Alabama Events

Trailfest 2015 events in Alabama are made possible by major grants from the Alabama State Council on the Arts and the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state agency of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Alabama State Council on the Arts - click to visit their website                                National Endowment for the Humanities

The National Endowment for the Arts                South Arts

 

 

A Railroad Crossing in DemopolisThe Way We Worked, A Smithsonian Exhibit and The Way We Worked Creatively

April 9, 2015, through May 2015
Demopolis

"The Cotton Club" by James Haskins of DemopolisThe Marengo County History and Archives Museum, the original Merchants Grocery beside a busy railway just south of downtown Demopolis, hosts the traveling Smithsonian Exhibition, The Way We Worked, with support from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state agency of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), in April and May 2015. Spanning the years 1857 to 1987, the exhibition's 86 photographs depict America's workplaces and how the country's workforce has been shaped by social change, equality and freedom for over a century.

In collaboration with the Marengo County Historical Society, the Museum will supplement the exhibit with its own programs about Alabama cabinet makers, featuring Christopher Lang (Lyon Hall, Saturday, April 11, at 1 p.m.), and the work of ministers and rabbis ("Rock in a Weary Land," Morning Star Baptist Church, April 19, at 2 p.m.). These partners plus the Demopolis Public Library and the Southern Literary Trail will also add a unique Demopolis imprint to the exhibit with The Way We Worked Creatively, featuring the creative work of writers, artists, and designers influenced by the town.

Bette Davis in "The Little Foxes"Promotional photo for "The Cotton Club" (Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1984) from book by James HaskinsSome of their creations such as the book The Cotton Club by Demopolis-born James Haskins and The Little Foxes, Lillian Hellman's play about her Demopolis family, have even translated into meaningful work for the artists of Broadway and Hollywood. To illustrate the point, Donna Meester, Jacki Armit and Daniel Whitlow of The University of Alabama Theatre Department in Tuscaloosa will construct likenesses of film costumes worn by Bette Davis (The Little Foxes, 1941) and Diane Lane (The Cotton Club, 1984) for the exhibit.

Place: The Marengo County History and Archives Museum, Walnut St., Downtown Demopolis
Dates and Times: April 9, 2015, through May 2015.
Opening Night: Thursday, April 9, 2015, at 6 p.m. with champagne reception
Admission: Free for all events
Info: Call the Museum at 334.289.0599.

 
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Courtesy, Monroe County Museum"To Kill A Mockingbird," the play at Monroe County Museum

April 10, 2015 through May 15, 2015
Monroeville

The Mockingbird Players of Monroeville present the 25th season of "To Kill a Mockingbird," the play, based upon the Pulitzer Prize winning novel. The Georgia-Pacific Amphitheater is home for the popular play on the grounds of the Monroe County Museum and the Old Courtesy, Monroe County MuseumCourthouse in the heart of Monroeville, regarded as the model for Maycomb in the novel. During the famous trial scenes of "Mockingbird" when Atticus Finch defends the falsely-accused Tom Robinson, the drama moves into the actual courtroom where Harper Lee's father practiced law. Annually this production of "Mockingbird" attracts audience members from around the world. This year, the Jane Austen Society of Australia will be among the audiences as its members tour the Southern Literary Trail. Tickets are available on February 2, 2015, for groups and on March 2, 2015, for all others.

Place: The Monroe County Museum in Monroeville, Alabama
Dates: April 10, 2015 to May 16, 2015
Times and tickets: Call 251.575.7433 or go to www.monroecountymuseum.org.
Info: Call 251.575.7433

 
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A Port 68 Design by Mark AbramsPlace in Art and Design: Influences from Home

May 1, 2015
Demopolis

As an event for the Smithsonian Exhibition, The Way We Worked, during its Spring 2015 stop at the Marengo County History and Archives Museum in Demopolis, acclaimed artists in writing, painting and design with attachments to the town talk about the influences of home on their work. Demopolis native Rusty Goldsmith, retired Rector of St. Mary's-on-the-Highlands of Birmingham, speaks about the impact of Demopolis on his sermons and essays appearing in The Sewanee Review. One of Goldsmith's essays recalls the days of the Lyon Hall c. 1850-53venerable Merchants Grocery in the building that now houses the Museum.

Carolyn Goldsmith's artworks have been displayed in regional galleries such as the Monty Stabler Galleries (Birmingham), the Judith Proctor Gallery (Seaside, Florida), and the Bennett Galleries (Nashville). Her work has also been presented by Birmingham's Civil Rights Institute and the Huntsville Museum of Art. Mark Abrams of Demopolis is an ARTS Award winner and designer for Port 68, a home décor company specializing in table lamps, accent furniture, upholstered chairs, benches and home accessories. All will discuss the influence of home and place on the way they have worked.

This event is presented by the Marengo County History and Archives Museum, the Marengo County Historical Society, the Demopolis Public Library and the Southern Literary Trail as a feature of The Way We Worked exhibition with grant support by the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state agency of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Place: To be announced.
Date and Time: Friday, May 1, 2015 at time to be announced.
Admission: Free
Info: Call the Museum at 334.289.0599 or the Library at 334.289.1595.

 
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Zelda and Scott FitzgeraldThe 21st Annual Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald Museum Gala

90 Years of "Gatsby"
May 2, 2015
Montgomery

IIn the Old Cloverdale home once occupied by America's iconic Jazz Age couple, the annual Fitzgerald Museum Gala salutes Zelda and Scott with revelry, food, dancing and music under a tent on the lawn and within the surroundings of a well-known American romance. Fine art and decorative objects by local artists are offered for silent auction. This year's Gala observes the 90th anniversary date of Fitzgerald's seminal 1920s novel, "The Great Gatsby." The ticketed event always proves to be a premiere social occasion for Trailfest celebrants and visitors.

Place: The Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald Museum, 919 Felder Avenue, Montgomery
Date: Saturday, May 2, 2015
Time: 8 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.
Info and Tickets: Call the Museum at 334.264.4222.

 
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Courtesy, University of Alabama Press"Truman Capote and the Legacy of In Cold Blood" by Ralph Voss

Presented with the Maysles Brothers film "With Love from Truman"
May 28, 2015
Montgomery

Author Ralph F. Voss was a high school junior in Plainville, Kansas, in November of 1959 when four members of the Herbert Clutter family were murdered in Holcomb, Kansas, by shotgun blasts from two unknown intruders. In his book and this special program, Truman Capote and the Legacy of "In Cold Blood," Voss examines Capote and his famous book about the murders from many perspectives: the crowning glory of Capote's career and its larger status in American popular culture. As depicted in many films including the Oscar-winning Capote, the investigations by Capote and Harper Lee in Kansas have assumed legendary status and become part of the story. For this event, co-sponsored by the Trail and the Alabama Department of Archives and History, Voss will also introduce the rarely-seen short Maysles documentary about Capote in 1966: With Love from Truman. Presented with grant support from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state agency of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Place: The Alabama Department of Archives and History, Montgomery
Date and Time: Thursday, May 28, 2015, at 12 Noon
Admission: Free
Info: Call the Archives at 334.242.4435.

 
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